Our last Easter idea post was such a hit, I thought I'd go ahead and share a few Waldorf Easter suggestions as well.

We've been looking into some alternative elementary school options for our oldest son's 1st grade year, and one of the places we toured was a Waldorf center. We probably won't wind up there, for various reasons, but I love the philosophy and the way their schools encourage creative and experiential education. Waldorf learning tools tend to take a back-to-basics approach and are super-flexible for all ages. They're perfect for parents who want to keep multiple kids busy without the usual clutter that tends to fill Easter baskets!

Beeswax Block Crayons. Before getting these, we used to go through more crayons than I care to admit. I realized one day that with the number of crayons my little toddler and even the older kids broke, they weren't learning much in the way of sustainability or how to care for their items. Block crayons from Stockmar are pricey, but they're stronger and far more appropriate for clumsy little hands. My boys love to use the edges for detail work and the smooth sides for filling in rainbows and making broader strokes.

Modeling Beeswax. For fidgety kids, this stuff is a Godsend. I got tired of finding modeling clay in my rug, and even kinetic sand wound up all over the place. Beeswax warms in the kids' hands to a naturally-pliable state for fun new creations every time they pick it up. This is the answer if you're looking for a hands-on, workable substance that won't flake or dry out.

Peg dolls. Stop buying action figures over and over again! These cute peg dolls are inexpensive and way more fun, and they'll inspire a ton of creativity. The kids can draw on them with their crayons, and you can add some details with a felt-tip pen. Try making mini replicas of your own family and friends for storytime!

Play scarves and clips. These are the things my childhood was made of. These perfectly-sized scarves are durable and make great capes, fort components and even makeshift totes for gathering rocks and sticks. The kid-friendly clips won't smash little fingers, and they're super-handy for forts!

For decor, we simply use a wooden bunny statue that we picked up at Goodwill years ago. We figure the kids don't need new stuffed rabbits year-after-year. Amazon has a bunch of really cute options that could easily serve as the centerpiece for an Easter morning display.

At our house, the Easter Bunny leaves little string backpacks for the Easter egg hunt instead of an individual basket for each kid. It's less for us to store, and they come in handy for trick-or-treating, Santa sacks as well as theme parks and camping trips. We do have one nice, decorative Easter basket that we use to display healthy treats (Halos are a fantastic, kid-friendly alternative to chocolate and sugary sweets!). For us, it's all about thinking outside of the box and maintaining tradition in a way that makes sense for our own individual family.

waldorf easter | easter basket ideas | waldorf toys | minimalist toys

What in your family's Easter basket? Do you have any favorite minimalist toys?